Monthly Archives: May 2016

How to Fat Loss With Supplement

The phytochemical capsaicin is the substance found in chili peppers that contributes to the hot and spicy flavor of the chili pepper.

This miraculous compound has the unique capacity to promote a wide range of positive effects on human health, including reduced body fat, powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and improved cardiovascular health.

In fact, a recent epidemiological study investigating almost half a million people showed that the habitual consumption of chili-rich foods, loaded with capsaicin, reduced the likelihood of death from certain chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease, relative to those who did not consume chili-rich, spicy foods.1

In addition to capsaicin activating the TRPV1 receptor in certain neurons found within thegastrointestinal tract, triggering a process known as thermogenesis that burns body fat, capsaicin also produces many additional health benefits by activating the same TRPV1 receptor, yet in other tissues throughout the body.

Activation of TRPV1 within these tissues triggers the function of different protein molecules, resulting in unique effects that are tissue-specific.

One of the more influential TRPV1-dependent effects from capsaicin intake is the activation of TRPV1-expressing neurons within the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, which ultimately increases the amount of energy expenditure in brown adipose tissue (BAT) by a process known as thermogenesis.2

Although the mechanism of action is not completely understood, some of the details include capsaicin activation of the TRPV1 receptor within the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, which triggers the release of noradrenaline.

The release of noradrenaline then stimulates the process of thermogenic fatty acid oxidation within BAT, which has the unique capacity of uncoupling the normally linked process of fatty acid oxidation with cellular energy production in the form of ATP. Consequently, the energy is instead directly converted into heat, which effectively increases energy expenditure.

Several studies looking at the impact of capsaicin on metabolic rate have shown that capsaicin does enhance energy expenditure while boosting fat oxidation, promoting significant weight loss.3,4

It has also been shown that the positive influence of capsaicin on thermogenesis is greatest in those people with the most BAT5, and there is some evidence indicating that sustained intake of capsaicin can increase BAT levels in humans6 — meaning that long-term capsaicin intake could boost BAT levels, improving the capacity to thermogenically burn body fat.

The consumption of capsaicin can also reduce appetite and food intake2, further supporting the ability to lose weight— and, perhaps more importantly, keep it off for good. Although the appetite-suppressing effect of capsaicin has been observed in several trials, it is not entirely understood how capsaicin reduces appetite.

That said, some details have been uncovered with the release of noradrenaline triggered by capsaicin, as previously mentioned, appearing to contribute to the reduction in appetite— as the stimulation of the noradrenaline receptors in the brain has been shown to produce feelings of satiety.7

In addition, capsaicin intake has also been shown to cause an increase in the gut-derived hormone GLP-1, which turns on regions of the brain that diminish food intake by reducing hunger.8

Moreover, this effect appears to be TRPV1-dependent, as the hunger-reducing impact of capsaicin was absent in mice that were genetically altered so they could not produce the TRPV1 receptor in gastrointestinal cells.

Overall, studies have shown that the consumption of capsaicin does decrease hunger3, as capsaicin-treated subjects typically report a reduced desire to eat while also achieving greater satiety after meals.

Know more about caffeine

Coffee is the nectar of the gods.

Partially because the aroma of it is the planets best aphrodisiac and it tastes like a million angles are dancing on sunshine, but most importantly it contains caffeine.

Ok, this is probably a bit of hyperbole but coffee is one of the most popular beverages consumed in the world.

In fact, the average American drinks 3.1 cups of coffee per day and we spend approximately $40 billion on coffee each year1. That number is mind-boggling.

Caffeine has garnered a lot of attention in both the fitness world and in the research world due to a lot of the performance and health properties it can convey. Sadly, as with most health claims, many of the things you hear are like unicorns, they aren’t real.

Now since caffeine is one of the most consumed “drugs” on the planet I think we ought to set the record straight and clear up a few of the myths surrounding caffeine.

1. CAFFEINE DEHYDRATES YOU

People think that because coffee makes you pee it dehydrates you. I never really understood that logic, it is missing a lot of steps and doesn’t really make any sense when you think about it. For example, drinking water makes you pee but drinking water is how you hydrate.

The body’s fluid balance system is a lot more complicated than that. Honestly, sometimes journalists’ logic baffles me at times. This is where science is important. We can actually ask and answer the question of, “Does caffeine dehydrate you”?

Fortunately for us, several studies have looked at whether caffeine consumption actually dehydrates you. For example, one studied looked at a dose response of caffeine and diuresis (making more urine) and found that daily intakes of caffeine at 3 and 6 mg per kg per day over a span of 11 days does not have a real effect on fluid balance and hydrations status2.

Now that is great and all when considering the study was conducted with pure caffeine, but what about caffeinated beverages and all the other things that go with them? I am glad you asked. Here is a study that showed that black tea also doesn’t do squat as a diuretic and hydrates you just as well as water3.

2. CAFFEINE IS A GOOD FAT BURNER

Caffeine is marketed as a fat burner pretty heavily. The thing about it is that it can be a fat burner. . . but it likely doesn’t work the way you think it does.

The old version of caffeine being a fat burner goes something like this: caffeine causes fat cells to release fatty acids which is then burned for energy. This is kind of true but not really. The data is a little more complex than that.

When you really get down to the nitty gritty, it looks like caffeine increases lipid mobilization by a significant amount but most of that fat isn’t actually burned, about 75% of it is actually recycled, meaning it’s “released” from fat cells and then stored again without being used4.

So caffeine probably won’t directly increase fat loss but it may increase your training capacity, making increased fat-loss a byproduct.

In addition to the fact that most of the “mobilized” fat is simply recycled, caffeine loses its efficacy over time. Much like alcohol or drugs, your body habituates to caffeine and eventually it loses its ability to be stimulated by caffeine. At some point it becomes a “return to normal function” supplement.

If you take a second to think about this you realize how true it is. Think about the first time you had a cup of coffee in the morning and how alert and ready to go you felt. Now fast forward 15 years and think about how you feel like one of those zombies in The Walking Dead until that first cup of coffee kicks in and you feel a little more human.

If you abuse coffee/caffeine as much as I do it might take the whole pot to get you back to normal. . . I should probably take a caffeine break sometime soon.

3. CAFFEINE IS GOOD FOR PERFORMANCE

People often tout caffeine as the ultimate performance enhancer. This is true to some extent. It is the most effective, legal, ergogenic aid we have on the market, For example, people who are not habituated to caffeine can see increases in strength and power from pre-exercise caffeine supplementation.

Sadly, there is a very large “habituation” effect and caffeine loses its efficacy overtime. In fact, if you want to really maximize your caffeine you should cycle on and off it regularly. This is part of the reason you only get that “first time I took pre-workout feeling” once in your lifetime.

The other reason caffeine may not help your performance is the type of exercise you engage in. Caffeine is a known stimulate than can increase heart rate. In certain cases an elevated heart rate is actually a good way to ruin your performance.

In “metcon” style workouts where your goal is to sustain a relatively high workload for an extended period of time a higher resting rate will actually decrease your time to fatigue, which is the opposite effect of what you want.

Let me wrap this thing up in short, snappy sentences. Caffeine is awesome, coffee is my favorite source. It doesn’t dehydrate you. It isn’t the key to getting shredded.

It can help power production and fatigue in some situations but can hurt you during metcon style workouts. Cycling on and off is probably the best idea if you want to use caffeine to augment your performance.

The Key Mineral For Your Supplements

While magnesium is best known as a relaxing ingredient in the popular nighttime supplement ZMA, the benefits of magnesium are extremely impressive and extend far beyond sleep alone.

In this article you will learn everything about this key mineral and how regular supplementation can advance your health and even your physique, one step further.

BACKGROUND TO MAGNESIUM AND MAGNESIUM DEFICIENCY

In the body, magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral and the second most abundant electrolyte. Magnesium is a key cofactor for over 300 metabolic reactions in the body.

Some of the primary roles of magnesium in the body include1,2,3:

  • protein synthesis,
  • muscle and nerve function,
  • blood glucose control,
  • blood pressure regulation,
  • energy production,
  • DNA synthesis,
  • muscle contraction.

With such a wide range of functions, magnesium deficiency is always going to be of serious concern. The United States daily recommended intake is 420 mg for men and 310 mg for women4.

Related: ZMA Supplements – Do They Improve Sleep & Test Levels?

At present, research estimates that at least 60% of Americans do not consume the recommended daily amount of magnesium in their diets. Remember, that the deficiency level is far below the optimal range for an athlete, or someone who wants to optimize their health and physique5.

The big issue around magnesium intake is limited access to natural sources. Although magnesium is a rather abundant mineral, there is no major food source that provides a high quality amount of magnesium. The foods highest in magnesium include unrefined (whole) grains, spinach, nuts, legumes, and potatoes. However, you would need to eat unrealistic amounts to get a high magnesium intake6.

Along with issues around obtaining magnesium naturally, there are a large number of factors that can reduce our rate of magnesium storage and absorption. Most notable of them are7:

  • Excess alcohol, diuretics, coffee, tea, salt, phosphoric acid (sodas), calcium, potassium and sugar.
  • Intense stress.
  • Drugs and some supplements (foscarnet, aminoglycosides, amphotericin B, cyclosporine, azathioprine, cisplatin, citrated blood, excess vitamin D).
  • Several health conditions (vomiting, diarrhea, renal transplantation, etc.).
  • Insufficient water intake.

The most common way to determine magnesium deficiency is by measuring total serum concentrations. A healthy range is between 0.7 and 1.05 mM8. However, most of the body’s magnesium is stored in bone, muscle and soft tissues, with only 1% of the body’s magnesium content stored in the serum9.

Therefore, unless severe magnesium deficiency is present, measuring serum magnesium concentrations is unlikely to be an effective way of diagnosing deficiency10. This means, it is possible that a large majority of the population is actually magnesium deficient, but not to the extent that it would be identified when measuring serum concentrations.

Severe signs of minor of magnesium deficiency include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. If this deficiency continues and progresses, other issues such as abnormal heart rhythms, tingling, numbness, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures and coronary spasms can occur2,4.